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Thursday, January 31, 2013

Real Mayfly

The Modern Day No-Hackle




Several years back, I used to frequent a river that had many slow meandering sections that were LOADED with wily browns and rainbows.  There were more productive sections of the river, but there is something about being able to plainly see feeding trout that makes one stop to ponder.  I called these fish "fly inspectors" because they would rush over to the newly landed mayfly and just sit there under it and watch it go by.  I think that every trout angler has been window-shopped like this before, but it got frustrating when it was almost every cast.  I eventually figured out that the classic no-hackle was the thing that worked the best, but it would last one fish until the wings were mangled back to window shopping status.  I had just bought some medallion sheeting and started to experiment with making something that would seal the deal with the inspectors.  The Real Mayfly is the result of many test trips back to that river, and even though the wings can get a bit deformed when you catch a fish, the sheeting is durable enough to mend back into place.  I have found that a sticky liquid floatant like Enrique's Poo Goo, or Loon Aquel are a must for this bug.  I have tried fishing this bug in many applications, and it really isn't designed to fish in faster water or riffles.  Only in the window shopper zone.


Cheech



Material List

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Hook: TMC 101 Dry Fly Hook - 18 - 25 Pack     
Thread: Veevus Fly Tying Thread - Olive - 16/0     
Tail: Mayfly Tails - Light Dun     
Body: Nature's Spirit Turkey Biot Quills - Baetis     
Wings: Medallion Sheeting - Buggy Light Dun     
Legs: Antron Yarn - Gray     
Head: Nature's Spirit Fine Natural Dubbing - Baetis     

Other tools from the tutorial:


Tips:  I like to keep this as sparse (note 16/0 thread and light wire hook) as possible with a bit of bulk at the head.  The head will retain floatant.  Also, I tie in a split tail with two fibers on each side (added buoyancy) because even window shoppers won't count your tails.

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