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The Moodah Poodah

The Moodah Poodah

The Chimera of Dry Flies Moodah Poodah Collection The Moodah Poodah is one of the more wacky names we've stuck to a fly pattern, but it lives up to its uniqueness with a penchant for hooking a lot of fish. In fact, it got its name even before the pattern itself was designed. While I won't go into the gory details, it all started with a post-fishing stop to eat some grub and a run-in with a not-so-friendly waitress who hardly said a word to us the whole meal. And if you know some rudimentary Spanish, you might understand where the name came from. But funky names aside, the pattern here, similar to the Chimera fly, was designed to imitate a variety of bugs in all sorts of colors. The color shown in the tutorial is black which can pass as a Cicada, drowning ant, cricket or any other blackish insect that might happen along. Throw in olives and browns for drakes or other mayflies and a crazy purple version and you can see the color options are really endless. And beyond th

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The Crack-Back Aero PMD

The Crack-Back Aero PMD

Learn to Paint Cracks Crack Back PMD -- Aero Style My first exposure to "crack back" style flies came about mostly by observation of the naturals I was seeing in the local tailwaters I fished. As I'll get into a bit later here, when I ultimately dialed in the pattern, I remember a couple of times fishing a stretch of productive PMD water that ran along side a highway that was under construction. For the few days my fishing time coincided with the lunch break of the construction workers, I entertained them with sight-fishing to PMD-munching brown trout. But more importantly, I found a pattern that would end up a staple in the PMD section of my box. Pale Morning Duns, or PMD's, are sometimes an overlooked bug on a lot of rivers I've fished, but it's still a good idea to have a variety of imitations for these common and important mayflies. Not only do they bring a lot of fish to the surface at times, but unlike the Baetis hatch, my experience early on

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Terrestrial Bootcamp 2015: June 11th to the 14th

Terrestrial Bootcamp 2015: June 11th to the 14th

Take your terrestrials up a notch or two June 11th through 14th 2015 Hey all, we're excited to announce an ongoing series of unique themed fly fishing and tying "Bootcamps" we're arranging and hosting. We've been working on this concept now for a while and we're excited to get it started here really soon in June. Our inaugural bootcamp is going to be based around terrestrials. We know it's super-short notice, but we've been busy making arrangements to get this first event setup and running. We had talked about an Alaskan or salt water or even Chile or Argentina destination (and those will likely come down the road), but we've found the ideal setting a lot closer to home. Piggy Bow who ate a Grumpy Frumpy We've teamed up with the great folks at Savery Creek Fishing, in south-central Wyoming , to provide an incredible opportunity to fish a remote and unique small stream that has enormous fly-friendly Rainbows and some pretty Colora

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Bullet Head - Stonefly Edition

Bullet Head - Stonefly Edition

Add some ammo to your big dry fly box Several years ago I was tying at an expo when I was challenged to tie a fly out of Rainy's Tube Bodiz stonefly bodies.  I put it on a hook and added a pretty pronounced bullet head to create what is now the Petite Sirloin Stonefly .  More importantly, that was about the time when I decided to challenge myself to tie better bullethead flies.  At first I'd tie them just to have a really cool fly tied out of mostly natural materials, and I didn't love to fish them because the head would explode at the sight of a trout tooth.  Truth be told, those cool looking natural flies were very fishy, attracted wary trout, and it turned out that I could make the head last quite a bit longer with the proper glue.  It's really not a hard pattern to tie once you practice it a little bit. Bullet eating trout This particular bullet head pattern can be fished as a golden stone or a tannish yellow hopper.  On a recent fishing trip I fis

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Klinkhamer Variant

Klinkhamer Variant

What bend is on YOUR hook? I don't think the Klinkhamer Special is any secret, so I won't go into details about the original design of the pattern.  BUT...  the hook is really what makes this pattern so effective.  It's a hook that starts out with a straight eye, a straight shank, and then the whole thing gets dropped down to China town.  The idea is that a parachute style fly will sit with the parachute out of the water, and the rest of the fly down in the water mimicking an emerger struggling to get fully emerg-ized.  There are many hooks that are built for this purpose: Partridge Klinkhamer Extreme : With a very aggressive bend profile. Daiichi 1160 : This is the hook we use 90% of the time.  I think this hook profile is ideal. Daiichi1167 : The same as the 1160, just with a black nickel finish like Knight Rider. You can mix and match the colors and dubbings for this fly, but we have been using a lot of Nature's Spirit snowshoe rabbit foot dubbing du

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