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Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Easy Glo Bugs

Two simple and effective egg patterns

Good Eggs in a carton

This is a post that deserves a public service announcement...  Kind of.  In the fly fishing world there seem to be many opinions out there...  Naturals vs. synthetics, barbed vs. barbless, tenkara vs. the rest of the world, etc.  Eggs are no stranger to controversy and opinion, and I have no issues at all if you choose not to fish with them.  As fly tyers and fishers, we strive to tie and fish with bugs that mimic a trout's natural diet, hence tying size 26 midges, mayflies with three tails and split wings, and - EGGS.  I'm not saying that you go camp on a redd and pick off each fish that is actively doing it's business; I'm saying that during the trout spawn (either in the spring or fall) there are lots of other fish in the river that are not spawning, and actively feeding on eggs.  I'm not going to get into all the details, but it is definitely worth it to educate yourself about the fisheries that you fish, and how you can ethically pursue fish with eggs without damaging the future of the river.
Two Egg Variations

Ok...  So now on to tying an egg pattern.  You would be surprised at how many requests we get about how to tie a good, round egg.  It's really not hard at all, but two materials will definitely make your life easier: GSP thread (I prefer 100D), and McFlyfoam yarn.  The standard egg yarn doesn't compress and flare like McFlyfoam does.  The hook isn't super critical, and there are like infinity colors that you can choose from and mix up.

As a bonus we added a pattern that was shown to me by Mickey Anderson of Fish Tech Outfitters in Salt Lake City.  If I ever need a fly that has a fish guarantee written on it, I'll talk to Mick.  He described a fly that he calls the "good egg" a few years back, and it's been my #1 producer ever since.  It incorporates UV properties and a tungsten bead to counteract the somewhat buoyant nature of the McFlyfoam.  

~ Cheech


Material Lists


McCheese Glo Bug
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Hook: Daiichi 1520 - Heavy Egg Hook - 10     
Thread: Veevus GSP - White - 100 Denier     
Yarn: McFly Foam - McCheese #24     


Fl. Peach Glo Bug
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Hook: Daiichi 1520 - Heavy Egg Hook - 10     
Thread: Veevus GSP - White - 100 Denier     
Yarn: McFly Foam - Fl. Peach #46     


Steelhead Orange Glo Bug
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Hook: Daiichi 1520 - Heavy Egg Hook - 10     
Thread: Veevus GSP - White - 100 Denier     
Yarn: McFly Foam - Steelhead Orange #42     


Good Egg - McCheese
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Hook: Daiichi 1520 - Heavy Egg Hook - 10     
Thread: Veevus GSP - White - 100 Denier     
Yarn: McFly Foam - McCheese #24     
Bead: Plummeting Tungsten Beads - Fl. Orange - 7/64" (2.8mm)     
Nucleus: Ice Dub - UV Hot Orange     


Good Egg - Fl. Peach
Add to Cart   View in store
Hook: Daiichi 1520 - Heavy Egg Hook - 10     
Thread: Veevus GSP - White - 100 Denier     
Yarn: McFly Foam - Fl. Peach #46     
Bead: Plummeting Tungsten Beads - Fl. Pink - 7/64" (2.8mm)     
Nucleus: Ice Dub - UV Cinnamon     


Other tools from the tutorial:
Umpqua U501 Egg Hook - 50 Pack - 10     
Gamakatsu C14S Glo Bug Hook - 10     
Fly Tyer's Z-Ment     
Loon Razor Scissors - 4"     





3 comments:

  1. Mickey does have some really cool flies out there. His egg is pretty cool. Thanks for sharing!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Cheech my man, does it bother you as much as t bothers me with the gap at the bottom of the hook? Or should I just suck it up and "the trout don't care"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The gap is critical on glo bugs because it's a fairly dense ball o stuff on the hook shank... Anyway, The trout don't care one single little bit. They just see the egg and go for it...

      Delete

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